Month: July 2016

Avoid PR Disasters with the Perfect Social Media Policy

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Belgrade - May 07, 2014 Facebook, Twitter And Other Popular Soci

Do your employees know which countries giraffes reside in? Have they ever heard of the Challenger disaster? While these questions may seem pointless and completely unrelated to social media, they have actually been the cause of several PR disasters. During the 2014 World Cup Championship, Delta Air Lines congratulated Team USA on their victory over Ghana by tweeting a picture of the Statue of Liberty for the U.S. and a giraffe for Ghana. Twitter users quickly pointed out that there are no giraffes in Ghana.

That was a relatively minor slip up compared to a month later, when American Apparel posted a picture of the space shuttle Challenger explosion on their Tumblr. According to their official apology, their social media manager was born after the disaster and was unaware of it.

This doesn’t mean that all of your marketers should receive history and geography lessons. The dozens of other PR disasters that happen on social media every year occur for any number of reasons. What it does mean is that your organization needs a social media policy to prevent PR mistakes and to mitigate the damage if any potentially harmful messages are released.

Preventing Social PR Disasters

The best way to prevent social media blunders is to only allow company messages to come from one person and one social media account. Unfortunately, that’s not the best way to receive any real engagement on your social channels.

Social media messages that are shared by employees reach 561% further than those shared by official company channels.

Using employee social advocacy safely and successfully requires that you and your employees have a clear understanding of what messages are encouraged and which should be avoided.

Build a Strategy and Social Media Policy to Guide Your Employee Advocacy

If you have a social media strategy, share it with your employees. Giving them an understanding of what your social goals and positioning are will show them how their networks can best support the brand. In addition to strategy, a clear social media policy should also define what employees can and cannot do online.

Establish Guidelines for Posting

Avoid sending your employees a 50-page document of Social Media Don’ts. Your guidelines should encourage sharing! Make your guidelines simple and based on common sense. Most of the information will be better communicated through training, but it will be valuable to have an official document in case any incidents occur.

Train Your Employees on Social Media

53% of salespeople say they’d like social media training. Despite this fact, 93% of them have received no formal training from their company.

Look to Dell for an example of an excellent social media training program. Over the past 5 years, Dell’s Social Media and Community University has trained over 15,000 of their employees on social media best practices. The benefits they’ve seen extend to all areas of their business:

  • Sales via social media has seen a 69% year-over-year increase.
  • With 4,000 customer service cases a week on social media, they hold a 98% first-time resolution rate.
  • 89% increase in the number of external hires coming from employee social referrals.

Provide Employees with Social Media Content to Share

Supplying employees with suggested social media content is another way to increase advocacy while also controlling the messages being sent out. You can send out regular post suggestions or for certain salespeople and brand advocates you can post on their behalf through a social media lead generation tool like Socedo. This is particularly valuable for sales reps who need to regularly share messages to leads in a timely and relevant manner.

Responding to Social PR Disasters

No matter how well trained and informed your employees are, eventually a social media crisis will strike your company. However, that doesn’t need to spell disaster for your brand. Many companies have been applauded for how well they handled a PR disaster.

Two companies that prove this fact are DiGiorno and Entenmann’s. Both companies received backlash after unintentionally leveraging trending hashtags that were related to sensitive issues. Entenmann’s tweeted using the #NotGuilty hashtag related to the Casey Anthony murder verdict while DiGiorno used the #WhyIStayed hashtag related to domestic violence.

Entenmann’s responded by avoiding Twitter for years until they had lived down the crisis. On the other side, DiGiorno personally responded to offended Twitter users and went to great lengths to own their mistake.

Because of their response, DiGiorno was able to limit the damage done to their brand and continue to use Twitter as a valuable channel.

Create a Social Media PR Disaster Plan

In addition to your social media policy, you should have a formal plan in place that defines what a social media crisis means to your brand and what actions you will take in the event of one. Some incidents may require personal apologies to every offended customer, like in DiGiorno’s example. Some incidents may require you to put out a press release or issue a formal statement. Understanding what is required in various situations and having the resources in place to respond quickly will greatly reduce the damage a social media PR incident can have on your brand.

Monitor Your Online Reputation

Responding to PR disasters and regular customer complaints in a timely manner requires that you actually know about them. While users reference brands on Twitter all the time, less than 3% directly @mention the brand when they do. Monitoring real-time keywords can help you identify potential disasters the moment they occur so your response can be quick and effective.

Social media PR disasters happen. However, if you create clear guidelines so you and your employees can be authentic and communicate with honesty, you can limit the potential for major incidents and limit the damage they will have on your brand.

This article was originally featured on Duct Tape Marketing Network 

Teena ThachTeena Thach is Socedo’s social media and marketing specialist. Socedo is a demand generation system that empowers marketers to discover, engage with and qualify prospects through social media to generate revenue at scale.

 


The biggest security concerns startups face

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The following post was written by Jeremy Sutter, a tech and business writer, the original article was posted on PitchBook and can be found here 

Cybersecurity is quickly emerging as one of the most important threats to businesses in 2015 and beyond. The last few years have seen a massive rise in the utilization of Big Data, automated software tools, cloud storage, and other techniques and systems that involve harvesting customer data. These are lucrative, especially for marketing, but they also have created a whole new set of risks. All of that customer data is valuable for identity theft and similar unscrupulous uses. Hacker groups dedicate their time and resources to attempting to steal customer data. This poses an especially grave threat to startups, who typically have less resources of their own to dedicate to security. In this post, we'll outline three major forms of attacks and why they are so dangerous.

Direct Attack

Some hacking groups try to target businesses directly and breach their security. They might be obvious or subtle, but their goal is the same—to break into the company's network and find any valuable data or software around. That data could be anything from industrial secrets to credit card records or social security numbers—it need not be customer data, although that is the most common target. Direct attacks pit the ingenuity and dedication of hackers against that of the startup, and the greater experience of the hackers means they can frequently find some kind of hole. On the other hand, they are in it for the money, so if they can't locate an opening easily, they are likely to move on to a softer target.

Social Engineering

Sometimes it doesn't take a real breach to get access to sensitive data. Hacker groups frequently use social engineering to get passwords or permissions. This involves manipulating employees by, for example, posing as an IT worker and asking for a password to verify an account. They might also try calling up the ISP of the startup and try to obtain some information that way. Social engineering is easy to do, as well as cheap, so a hacker can spend their time sending emails or making calls instead of coding. It is faster and frequently just as effective, because they only need to find one link. The best way to defeat social engineering is to have strong security policies and ensure everyone follows them. That includes things like never putting passwords in emails, always verifying the identity of anyone purporting to be from IT, creating new passwords frequently, and conducting regular internal tests to probe for weaknesses.

Vendor Software

One of the biggest problems for startups is that they cannot control all of the software they use. Every business relies to a greater or lesser extent on external vendors. If the vendor becomes compromised, all of their clients are also at risk. It is common for hackers to target vendors first and then use corrupted vendor software as a springboard for getting into bigger targets, like banks and retailers. It is difficult to completely vet all vendor software, because the whole point of using a vendor is the convenience and speed compared to internal development.

This last point especially is leading to major changes in cybersecurity. There are growing calls for laws governing liability for breaches, both for companies in charge of data and the vendors that supply them. In addition, the market for insurance that covers data breaches is growing. More and more startups are getting business insurance quotesonline for policies that pay off if they are hacked, lessening the expected risk of such a breach. The fallout from an attack can be severe. The loss of customer trust and negative publicity is enough to doom a startup, to say nothing of any damage to the network or loss of essential data. Worse, some hackers slip in quietly and stay within a company for months or years, siphoning off data. The growing complexity and scale of the cybersecurity threat means that startups are finding it worthwhile to invest in insurance rather than try to go head to head with the hackers. It is hard to do when resources and time are already stretched thin moving the business forward.

 


Content Curation Tools to Make Your Content Rock

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Belgrade - May 07, 2014 Facebook, Twitter And Other Popular Soci

You might have heard that you should write your own posts so to get the attention of your audience and search engines. That it will increase your sales and keep your customers coming back to your website or blog. And yes, this is true. But it doesn’t mean that this strategy is the only one available, as publishing curated content can also help you to achieve the same goals and in a much more practical way.

You can actually write an entirely new article just by listing the best influencers’ ideas in your industry, for example. And your target audience will love it  –  nothing better than a perfectly organized list so that you can get to know what you want without having to go through tons of pages. But where can you find the best content related to your niche so to curate them wisely? This is where these 15 content curation tools below will help you out.

  1. Storify

Storify brings several cool features to your curated content. It will allow you to build a social newsroom so that multiple editors can add content from different locations through real-time collaboration. They also offer a great app with a drag-and-drop option, and you can search for photos and videos, not only texts.

  1. Feedly

If you miss Google Reader, you will love Feedly. You just need to type a couple of keywords to have access to news, blog posts, YouTube channels, and more, using their powerful RSS feed reader. You can also secure private content, organize everything into collections, tag stories and URLs (so you can read them later) and share your content on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, or by email. And as if it wasn’t enough, Feedly can be integrated with Hootsuite, Buffer, Evernote, Pocket and Instapaper as well.

  1. Triberr

Tribber put together content shared by communities of bloggers and influencers. So if you are in need of fresh ideas, just search their categories, and find out which groups are more related to your industry or to your favourite topics – and you can also share your own content there.

  1. Trap.It

Proud of their over 100,000 sources, Trap.It offers a content library focused on social selling and employee advocacy. The first time that you use it, you will search for whatever you want and storage it to read later. But the best thing comes next: based on your choices, the tool will learn, look for related content, and leave it nicely organized in folders for you.

  1. Quora

Quora is a great option for those who want to hear opinions and insights about any topic. And if you think that is a bit tricky to find out the accuracy of some answers, just check the upvote/downvote ranking. You can also write your own questions there and wait for the best answers.

Digital Marketing Branding Strategy Online Media Concept

  1. Scoop.It

With just one click, the content that you create on Scoop.it can be shared on social media, added to your website or blog, or used on email newsletters - they have partnerships with MailChimp, Hootsuite, WordPress, Wix, and more, so to make it happen. Plus, you can create you own digital magazine there and let other users follow your curated content.

  1. SlideShare

SlideShare is the place for you to go if you are looking for presentations. And quality won’t be a concern as over 70 million professionals, experts included, share their content there. We are talking about over 18 million slides distributed into 40 categories at your disposal -  and you can also upload your own files there.

  1. Quuu

Looking for curated content that you can share it directly on social media? Then you should try Quuu. With this tool, you can select your favourite categories; receive hand-curated content straight to your Buffer account; manually edit it; and share it with you followers. The free version provides you with 2 posts per day while the paid one will deliver 10 posts per day.

  1. Pinterest

Pinterest is a great social network platform to curate content. You just have to search it by keywords or categories and save your pins in your boards – so when you happen to need them, you will have great ideas of content waiting for you.

  1. Trust my Paper

Trust My Paper is a curation tool (and not only for papers!) with which you can ask professional copywriters to curate and create content for you. They also provide proofreading, editing, plagiarism-check and rewriting help for those in need. Their website also has plenty of relevant information about content writing.

  1. Pressly

With Pressly, you can put all your content in one place, share it with your team or community, and even insert call-to-actions. You can also add RSS feeds and social media networks, or simply use their bookmarklet or apps.

  1. Learnist

Search Learnist's categories and create boards, so to get your curated content organized there. It is also possible to use keywords instead, but the best thing here is that their content is always fresh and collected from niche leaders in their industries.

  1. MyCurator for WordPress

WordPress also has its own curated content solution. With this plugin, you will receive content filtered by your chosen keywords, and it will pre-fills the post with an image, attribution link, and an excerpt, so you can customize it as you wish.

 14.  Content Gems

Content Gems allows you to monitor and search through their 200,000+ RSS feeds or your own sources. You will be able to add different kinds of filters, such as keywords or social signals. These two things together will create a stream of curated content for you, so then you can share it on social media, or add it to emails, newsletters, apps, websites, intranets, and more.

   15.  Curata

Thanks to its self-learning software, more often you use Curata, faster it will improve itself and give you better search results back. You will also be able to organize everything you find after just a few clicks, so then you can publish it anywhere anytime.

 

Wrapping it up

Content curation can be a life-saver. It will provide you with fresh ideas related to your industry, so you can quickly write posts just by organizing them and adding your personal touch. But with so much information been published daily on the internet, it is understandable that you will need a powerful tool to make this task easier, such as those mentioned above.
So test each one of them, and see which one is the best fit for your needs. Even though they have the same goal, they will deliver it on their own particular style. So take your time with them, and don’t forget to make the most of any free extra resources that you can put your hands on.